Remembering the Kanji

Remembering the Kanji

Difficulty: ☠ ☠

Rating:  ✫ ✫ ✫

Okay, you see this one on every post regarding learning Japanese, so of course I had to include it here too!

Remembering the Kanji is a book about (wait for it) Remembering the Kanji! Funny that eh? Well there are over 10 000 kanji out there and over 2000 you need to know for basic reading so if your memory is only good for remembering every embarrassing thing you said in grade school like mine is, you can use all the help you can get!

I’ll start off with what I like about this book. It claims to help you remember the kanji and it does a pretty good job at it. The concept is fairly simple. It shows you how Kanji isn’t just a bunch of random characters (at least most times) but actually has a lot of repeating patterns called radicals. By understanding the radicals you can start to follow the logic that came in making kanji to begin with. The easiest example. 口 (kuchi) means mouth or opening. Therefore when you see it in other kanji later on it is often tied to being an opening. My personal favourite of course is that if 日 means sun and 月 (Tsuki) means moon, then 明日 (ashita) will mean “Tomorrow” because if the sun comes up, then the moon, then the sun again it’s tomorrow!

As you can see, when it lines up  like that, it’s pretty helpful. Though occasionally it can seem more like a reaaaaal stretch.

As for why this book has such a low rating? Well I guess it all boils down to what you want to get out of your Japanese studies. If you just want to know how to react to certain signs, stay out of trouble, and that kind of stuff, this book will work great for you, as you’ll instantly know the English word that corresponds with the Japanese kanji. But that strength also has the weakness that you will ONLY know the English word that corresponds with the Japanese kanji.

For those who are just starting, let’s give a basic explanation here. Japanese has three writing systems. Hiragana used mostly for particles, conjugations, and some Japanese words, Katakana used for foreign words or emphasis, and kanji used for most base words. While Hiragana and Katakana are phonetic based (you know what sound they make by looking at them) kanji has multiple readings. Therefore if you just know the definition of the kanji you won’t know how to say it.

AKA You won’t know how to write it on a computer or say the word to someone else which makes it pretty unhelpful for your vocab. But! If you are okay with that, this book does a good job at what it does!

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